Aug 282012
 


When planning to practice crop rotation it is crucial to be up to speed with plant family names. The reason for this is so that you don’t follow up with the same family of plants so as not to compromise all the good work you are doing. Plants belonging to the same family planted in the same spot as last crop can be prone to the same soil-living pest and diseases. Moving them around help prevent the build up of problems. The following is a basic breakdown of common vegetables and their families;

Chenopodiaceae
Beetroot family
Beetroot
Quinoa
Spinach
Swiss Chard
Cucurbitaceae
Marrow family
Cucumber
Zucchini
Melon
Pumpkin
Squash
Solanaceae
Potato family
Eggplant(Aubergine)
Peppers (Capsicum)
Potato
Tomato
Leguminosae (Fabaceae)
Pea & Bean family
Alfalfa
Beans
Peas
Clover
Fenugreek
Lupin
Umbelliferae (Apiaceae)
Carrot family
Carrot
Celeriac
Celery
Fennel
Parsley
Parsnip
Dill
Compositae (Asteraceae)
Daisy family
Chicory/Endive
Jerusalem Artichoke
Lettuce
Salsify
Alliaceae
Onion family
Garlic
Leek
Onion
Shallot
Cruciferae (Brassicaceae)
Cabbage family
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Kale
Kohlrabi
Mustard
Oriental Brassicas – e.g. Bok Choy
Radish
Swede
Turnip

  4 Responses to “Crop Rotation & the Importance of Family Names”

  1. Thank you for the list, however, which of these follows the other and in what order there are 8 different types does this mean I need to have 8 different rotating beds??

    I’m very new at plant rotation and am wanting to use this process as my vegetables have been struggling. Any advice or direction of where to find this information would be greatly appreciated.

    Many thanks in advance.
    deep in dirt

  2. According to an information sheet I have found, it all depends on how many garden beds you have. A four bed rotation would look like this:
    1) Legumes and Brassicas
    2) Acid lovers
    3) Sweet corn and curcubits
    4) Root crops and onions

    You rotate in that order. If you want 5 or 6 year rotation I can write that down also, if needed.

  3. Hi,

    I made two raised vege beds 1.8m x 1.5m x 60cm last weekend. I planted the veges in rows with no idea of crop rotation (ignorance is bliss). My question is when these crops are harvested what do i do to start crop rotation now that Ive been haphazard with my crop planning. Can i mix something into the two beds to start afresh.

    Many thanks

    Andrew

    • Maybe the best thing to do is to plant a green manure crop over winter. Since you will be planting in autumn a useful list of such plants is broad beans, fava beans, fenugreek, lupins, field peas, barley and oats. I sometimes use the dried peas that one can buy in bulk to make pea soup – but it might be risky using those if you can only get them at the supermarket since they may have been treated so they won’t sprout. I go to a bulk food store.

      That said, if this is the first year you have grown anything in the beds there wouldn’t have been much chance for disease to have built up in the soil, so you could possibly start you crop rotation straight away, but in any case plant the light feeders listed on http://www.sgaonline.org.au/crop-rotation/ and you can include plants like lettuce and silver beet which can be grown almost anywhere with other vegetables.

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